In case of a Raid

In Case Of A Raid

The Constitution protects everyone, regardless of immigration status, from discrimination based on race or national origin. In the United States, everyone is entitled to certain protections, including the right to be treated fairly in court, to free speech, religious freedom, and other core civil rights.

Learn about your rights

The immigrants have the right to:

• Remain silent.

• Speak with a lawyer as soon as posible.

It is recommended to immigrants:

•Do not lie or show false documents.

•Do not sign any paper without speaking to a lawyer.

•Always carry an information card about your rights.

•Memorize or carry the name and phone number of a trust immigration attorney.

•Memorize the alien’s registration number. It starts with the letter “A”.

• Prepare an emergency plan with the family.

• Do not sign any documents without consulting your lawyer first.

•Keep copies of all of your immigration documents with someone you trust.

If Immigration comes to your home…

•If the agents want to enter, ask them if they have a warrant signed by a judge. An administrative warrant of removal from immigration authorities is not enough. If they say they have a warrant, ask them to slip the warrant under the door.

•Look at the top and at the signature line to see if it was issued by a court and signed by a judge or issued by DHS or ICE and signed by a DHS or ICE employee. Only a court warrant signed by a judge allows entry into your premises.

•Read and review the warrant carefully. Do not open your door unless ICE shows you a warrant naming a person in your residence and/or areas to be searched at your address. In all other cases, keep the door closed and state clearly: “I do not consent to your entry.”

•If agents force their way in anyway, do not attempt to resist. State clearly: “I do not consent to your entry or to your search of these premises. I am exercising my right to remain silent. I wish to speak with a lawyer as soon as possible.” Everyone in the residence may also exercise the right to remain silent.

•Keep copies of all of your immigration documents with someone you trust. 3.

If Immigration comes to your workplace…

•Immigration officers are not allowed to enter your workplace — whether it is a factory, store, high rise, farm, or orchard — without permission from the owner or manager. If an officer does get permission, the officer is free to ask you questions about your immigration status.

• You have a right to keep silent. In most states, you don’t even have to tell the agent your name. Although you may want to provide your name only so your family or attorney can locate you.

• You also have the right to talk to a lawyer before you answer any questions. You can tell the officer, “I wish to talk to a lawyer,” in response to any question the officer asks you.

• You do not need tell the immigration officer where you were born or what your immigration status is.

• You do not have to show the officer your papers or any immigration documents. If the officer asks you for your papers, tell the officer, “I wish to talk to a lawyer.”

If you are stopped by Immigration on the street…

If you are being interrogated do not give false information, and do not give them false documentation. You can be charged with identity theft if you show them forged documents, or someone else’s documents, even if you have legal status. Remember that everything you say or do can be used against you.

What to do if immigration detains you…

•Do not take “voluntary departure” (that is, do not agree to leave the United States) without first talking to a lawyer. Signing a voluntary departure agreement means that you won’t get a hearing, you will have to leave the U.S., and you may never be allowed to enter the U.S. again or get legal immigration status.

•Do not sign “stipulated orders of removal” without first talking to a lawyer. Signing a stipulated order means that you waive your rights to a hearing before a judge and serves as a final order of removal (deportation) signed by the judge.

If you are arrested in an immigration detention center and you don’t want to return to your home country, you have the right to request a meeting with an immigration officer.

•Do not expect Immigration agents or the judge to explain your options, or to give you the right information. Wait to speak with a lawyer before saying or doing anything.

•You have the right to call an attorney or your family if you are detained. You have the right to be visited by an attorney in detention (Immigration jail).

•When you get a lawyer, you should tell the lawyer everything you think is important about your immigration case, including whether you have ever been arrested for a crime. It is important that anyone giving you legal advice knows everything about your case so that she or he can give you the best advice. It does not pay to lie or keep information from your lawyer.

•In most cases, Immigration must decide within 48 hours whether to put you into immigration proceedings (in front of a judge), and whether to keep you in custody or to release you on bond. After 72 hours, Immigration must give you a Notice to Appear (NTA). This is the notice that provides you with the information about your hearing before an Immigration Judge.

The right to pay a bond

•In most cases, you have the right to ask to be released from detention by paying a bond, or to ask for a bond hearing in front of a judge. (Bond is an amount of money paid to the government to guarantee that you will attend future court hearings.) The judge, though, may order that you stay in detention if the judge decides that you might not show up for your court hearing or that you are dangerous to others.

If you are going to be deported

•Try to speak with an immigration lawyer before leaving. If you leave, you may not be allowed to come back into the country for a certain number of years. It is important you know this before you leave, because if you come back earlier than you’re allowed to, you can be arrested for having committed a serious crime.

•If you are afraid to return to your home country, notify your deportation officer and the court immediately. You may be eligible to file a claim for asylum or other relief.

•If you are not given a hearing before an immigration judge, find out why and let your lawyer know immediately.

How to find a detainee

  • If you know the detainee’s Alien Registration Number, enter it into the locator along with the detainee’s country of birth. The Alien Registration Number (also known as the A-Number) is a unique 8 or 9 digit number assigned to all immigrants in removal proceedings and certain other immigrants who have previously applied for immigration benefits. The A-number is found on all correspondence from immigration to a person. If the A-Number has only 8 digits, you must add a zero in front of it for the system to recognize it.
  • You can also search by name. A detainee’s first and last names are required and must be an exact match (e.g., John Doe will not find Jon Doe or John Doe-Smith). If ICE’s records list a person’s name incorrectly, you will not be able to search for the detainee by name unless you know their recorded name. You are also required to select the detainee’s country of birth. It is optional to enter the detainee’s date of birth to further narrow the search.

Know your rights:

If you are detained by immigration or the police:

• Hand the card to the official, and remain silent.

• The card explains that you are exercising the right to refuse to answer any questions until you have consulted with a lawyer.

To whom it may concern:

Please be informed that I am choosing to exercise my right to remain silent and the right to refuse to answer your questions. If I am detained, I request to contact an attorney immediately. I am also exercising my right to refuse to sign anything until I consult with my attorney.

Learn about your rights

All persons in the U.S., therefore, have constitutional rights.

The immigrants have the right to:

• Remain silent.

• Speak with a lawyer as soon as posible.

It is recommended to immigrants:

•Do not lie or show false documents.

•Do not sigh any paper without speaking to a lawyer.

•Always carry an information card about your rights.

•Memorize or carry the name and phone number of a trust immigration attorney.

•Memorize the alien’s registration number. It starts with the letter “A”.

• Prepare an emergency plan with the family.

• Do not sign any documents without consulting your lawyer first.

•Keep copies of all of your immigration documents with someone you trust.

If ICE comes to your home

If the agents want to enter, ask them if they have a warrant signed by a judge. An administrative warrant of removal from immigration authorities is not enough. If they say they have a warrant, ask them to slip the warrant under the door.

•Look at the top and at the signature line to see if it was issued by a court and signed by a judge or issued by DHS or ICE and signed by a DHS or ICE employee. Only a court warrant signed by a judge allows entry into your premises.

•Read and review the warrant carefully. Do not open your door unless ICE shows you a warrant naming a person in your residence and/or areas to be searched at your address. In all other cases, keep the door closed and state clearly: “I do not consent to your entry.”

•If agents force their way in anyway, do not attempt to resist. State clearly: “I do not consent to your entry or to your search of these premises. I am exercising my right to remain silent. I wish to speak with a lawyer as soon as possible.” Everyone in the residence may also exercise the right to remain silent.

•Keep copies of all of your immigration documents with someone you trust.

If ICE comes to your workplace…

•Immigration officers are not allowed to enter your workplace — whether it is a factory, store, high rise, farm, or orchard — without permission from the owner or manager. If an officer does get permission, the officer is free to ask you questions about your immigration status.

• You have a right to keep silent. In most states, you don’t even have to tell the agent your name. Although you may want to provide your name only so your family or attorney can locate you.

• You also have the right to talk to a lawyer before you answer any questions. You can tell the officer, “I wish to talk to a lawyer,” in response to any question the officer asks you.

• You do not need tell the immigration officer where you were born or what your immigration status is.

• You do not have to show the officer your papers or any immigration documents. If the officer asks you for your papers, tell the officer, “I wish to talk to a lawyer.”

If you are stopped by ICE on the street…

If you are being interrogated do not give false information, and do not give them false documentation. You can be charged with identity theft if you show them forged documents, or someone else’s documents, even if you have legal status. Remember that everything you say or do can be used against you.

What to do if immigration detains you

Do not take “voluntary departure” (that is, do not agree to leave the United States) without first talking to a lawyer. Signing a voluntary departure agreement means that you won’t get a hearing, you will have to leave the U.S., and you may never be allowed to enter the U.S. again or get legal immigration status.

•Do not sign “stipulated orders of removal” without first talking to a lawyer. Signing a stipulated order means that you waive your rights to a hearing before a judge and serves as a final order of removal (deportation) signed by the judge.

If you are arrested in an immigration detention center and you don’t want to return to your home country, you have the right to request a meeting with an immigration officer.

•Do not expect Immigration agents or the judge to explain your options, or to give you the right information. Wait to speak with a lawyer before saying or doing anything.

•You have the right to call an attorney or your family if you are detained. You have the right to be visited by an attorney in detention (Immigration jail).

•When you get a lawyer, you should tell the lawyer everything you think is important about your immigration case, including whether you have ever been arrested for a crime. It is important that anyone giving you legal advice knows everything about your case so that she or he can give you the best advice. It does not pay to lie or keep information from your lawyer.

•In most cases, Immigration must decide within 48 hours whether to put you into immigration proceedings (in front of a judge), and whether to keep you in custody or to release you on bond. After 72 hours, Immigration must give you a Notice to Appear (NTA). This is the notice that provides you with the information about your hearing before an Immigration Judge.

The right to pay a bond

•In most cases, you have the right to ask to be released from detention by paying a bond, or to ask for a bond hearing in front of a judge. (Bond is an amount of money paid to the government to guarantee that you will attend future court hearings.) The judge, though, may order that you stay in detention if the judge decides that you might not show up for your court hearing or that you are dangerous to others.

If you are going to be deported

•Try to speak with an immigration lawyer before leaving. If you leave, you may not be allowed to come back into the country for a certain number of years. It is important you know this before you leave, because if you come back earlier than you’re allowed to, you can be arrested for having committed a serious crime.

•If you are afraid to return to your home country, notify your deportation officer and the court immediately. You may be eligible to file a claim for asylum or other relief.

•If you are not given a hearing before an immigration judge, find out why and let your lawyer know immediately.

How to find a detainee

  • If you know the detainee’s Alien Registration Number, enter it into the locator along with the detainee’s country of birth. The Alien Registration Number (also known as the A-Number) is a unique 8 or 9 digit number assigned to all immigrants in removal proceedings and certain other immigrants who have previously applied for immigration benefits. The A-number is found on all correspondence from immigration to a person. If the A-Number has only 8 digits, you must add a zero in front of it for the system to recognize it.
  • You can also search by name. A detainee’s first and last names are required and must be an exact match (e.g., John Doe will not find Jon Doe or John Doe-Smith). If ICE’s records list a person’s name incorrectly, you will not be able to search for the detainee by name unless you know their recorded name. You are also required to select the detainee’s country of birth. It is optional to enter the detainee’s date of birth to further narrow the search.

Always carry "Know your rights card"

If you are detained by immigration or the police:

• Hand the card to the official, and remain silent.

• The card explains that you are exercising the right to refuse to answer any questions until you have consulted with a lawyer.

To whom it may concern:

Please be informed that I am choosing to exercise my right to remain silent and the right to refuse to answer your questions. If I am detained, I request to contact an attorney immediately. I am also exercising my right to refuse to sign anything until I consult with my attorney.